Tag Archive | Snapshot Wisconsin

Snapshot Saturday: June 22nd, 2019

There are many telltale signs of summer, but our favorite here at Snapshot Wisconsin is the appearance of fawns on camera. Fawns are born with reddish brown coats and a collection of white spots; this coloration helps them blend in with the forest until they begin molting into their winter coats.

Have you “spotted” any fawns on your cameras yet?

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Did you know you can view and classify photos collected from Snapshot Wisconsin cameras across the state at www.SnapshotWisconsin.org? It’s a fun activity for the whole family!

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Snapshot Saturday: June 15th, 2019

Think of the iconic, raspy scream you hear from a raptor during a television show or movie. Did you know that it often belongs to the red-tailed hawk? No matter the species on screen, the call is often voiced-over by this hawk’s mighty and distinctive screech.

Check out this red-tailed hawk captured on a Dodge County Snapshot Wisconsin camera (you’ll have to imagine the sound yourself!)

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Interested in hosting your own Snapshot Wisconsin camera? Visit our webpage to find out how to get involved: https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/research/projects/snapshot/.

Snapshot Saturday: June 8th, 2019

True to their name, all bobcats share their distinctive, bobbed tails, but no two bobcats are made the same. Bobcat coats can vary so greatly that they can even be used to identify specific individuals during research projects. Check out this Clark County bobcat captured on a Snapshot Wisconsin trail camera!

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Did you know you can view and classify photos collected from Snapshot Wisconsin cameras across the state at www.SnapshotWisconsin.org? It’s a fun activity for the whole family!

June Volunteer of the Month

June’s Volunteer of the Month is
Ralph from Sauk County!

June’s Volunteer of the Month is Ralph from Sauk County! Ralph has been a Snapshot Wisconsin trail camera host for over two years. Growing up on a farm Ralph enjoyed rambling around the fields and forests, and although he spent his career as a machinist, his love for the forest endured. His motivation for joining Snapshot Wisconsin and hosting a trail camera was to examine several questions he had about his woods, including what predator-prey relationships existed and how many deer were on the landscape.

Volunteer of the Month

In addition to volunteering with Snapshot Wisconsin, Ralph is also the chair of the Chippewa Valley Chapter of the Wisconsin Woodland Owners Association (WWOA). As an active member of WWOA, Ralph enjoys helping other woodland owners learn how to sustainably manage and preserve their woodlands for present and future generations.

Thank you, Ralph! Thank you to all of our trail camera hosts and Zooniverse volunteers for helping us discover our wildlife together.

May #SuperSnap

This month’s #SuperSnap features one of the best quality wolf photos ever captured on a Snapshot camera. Thanks to @crazylikeafox and @smuerett for bringing attention to this one from Waupaca County! The Wisconsin DNR, along with other organizations, have monitored wolf populations in numerous ways including with a network of volunteers who conduct winter tracking surveys. If you want to learn more about wolves in general, visit our wolf fact sheet.

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Continue classifying photos on Zooniverse and hashtagging your favorites for a chance to be featured in the next #SuperSnap blog post. Check out all of the nominations by searching “#SuperSnap” on the Snapshot Wisconsin Talk boards.

Snapshot Saturday: May 25th, 2019

In addition to making excellent back-scratchers, trees also offer a tool for black bear to communicate with one another. These so called “rub trees” assist bears in shedding their winter coats while leaving behind their scent, making their presence known to passersby.

Check out this black back and their rub tree captured on a Marinette County Snapshot Wisconsin camera!

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Did you know you can view and classify photos collected from Snapshot Wisconsin cameras across the state at www.SnapshotWisconsin.org? It’s a fun activity for the whole family!

Snapshot Saturday: May 18th, 2019

Test your Wisconsin wildlife identification skills with this below trail camera image. These small, rare members of the weasel family were once extirpated from the state and later reintroduced in Wisconsin northwoods. Staff members were pleasantly surprised when the first individual of this species made their debut on a Snapshot Wisconsin camera in Vilas County this year!

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Interested in hosting your own Snapshot Wisconsin camera? Visit our webpage to find out how to get involved: https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/research/projects/snapshot/.

Snapshot Saturday: May 11th, 2019

Can you guess what tree-climbing species is featured in this Snapshot Saturday? We will give you a hint, their “crimson cousins” don’t share this skill!

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Did you know you can view and classify photos collected from Snapshot Wisconsin cameras across the state at www.SnapshotWisconsin.org? It’s a fun activity for the whole family!

May Volunteer of the Month

May’s Volunteer of the Month is
Chris from Portage County!

Volunteer of the MonthMay’s Volunteer of the Month goes to Chris from Portage County! Chris is a Professor of Biology at UW-Stevens Point. Chris was first introduced to citizen science around 10 years ago through the Wisconsin Bat Program. In collaboration with the Urban Ecology Center and Milwaukee area high school teachers, Chris has since developed a bat curriculum that incorporates citizen science, or as it is known in Milwaukee, community science.

Chris first discovered the Zooniverse platform about two years ago, which led him to learn about Snapshot Wisconsin. After he began hosting his own trail camera, Chris stated that he was initially annoyed by a fawn that rested in front of his camera resulting in hundreds of photos (which we are sure many volunteer have experienced!) Chris’s “aha moment” was then realizing how interesting the data collected about that fawn was – time alert, sleeping, stretching, foraging.

When asked about his advice for potential volunteers, Chris shared, “There are lots of citizen science projects, but Snapshot Wisconsin does a great job of motivating its volunteers. Start with Zooniverse. Snapshot Wisconsin was a pioneer project on this global platform and will connect you immediately to Wisconsin wildlife. If you are hooked by Snapshot like I was, you can consider hosting your own camera and become a small part of a big thing.”

Thank you, Chris! Thank you to all our trail camera hosts and Zooniverse volunteers for helping us discover our wildlife together.

Snapshot Saturday: May 4th, 2019

Trail cameras offer a non-invasive approach to monitor not only animals, but their surrounding habitats as well. In addition to capturing exciting images of wildlife Snapshot Wisconsin cameras are programmed to take a daily time-lapse image at 10:40 a.m.  As part of the project’s phenology research staff members began measuring the greenness in these time-lapse photos to determine when the different “phenophases”, or significant stages in the yearly cycle of a location’s vegetation, are occurring across the state.

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If you have noticed the vegetation around you becoming a little more colorful, that is because much of the state is entering the “greenup” phenophase. This Snapshot Saturday features a Sawyer County elk enjoying spring greenup from May 2018.

Interested in hosting your own Snapshot Wisconsin camera? Visit our webpage to find out how to get involved: https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/research/projects/snapshot/.