Archive by Author | jessicaknackert

November #SuperSnap

This playful coyote family from Rusk County has been deemed our #SuperSnap for November. Coyote parents are resourceful when preparing a den for their pups. Some coyotes will repurpose abandoned burrows from skunks, woodchucks, foxes, badgers, and even other coyotes to create a den. Female coyotes will also prepare several den sites that include multiple entrances for a quick escape if threatened by predators. 

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A huge thanks to Zooniverse participant @oregano for the #SuperSnap nomination!

Continue classifying photos on Zooniverse and hashtagging your favorites for a chance to be featured in the next #SuperSnap blog post. Check out all of the nominations by searching “#SuperSnap” on the Snapshot Wisconsin Talk boards.

October #SuperSnap

This month’s #SuperSnap goes to the slick pair of North American River Otters featured below from Vilas County. Otters are known to produce slide marks as they move their bodies along ice, snow, and mud on the edge of riverbanks. As the only species in the state to produce these distinct tracks, the Wisconsin DNR performs a series of aerial surveys in the winter to search for the presence of otter slide marks. This data is then incorporated into population estimates for the species. 

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A huge thanks to Zooniverse participant @Megeth for the #SuperSnap nomination!

Continue classifying photos on Zooniverse and hashtagging your favorites for a chance to be featured in the next #SuperSnap blog post. Check out all of the nominations by searching “#SuperSnap” on the Snapshot Wisconsin Talk boards.

September #SuperSnap

Check out this #SuperSnap of a woodchuck caught by one of our cameras in La Crosse County! Also known as groundhogs, these furry rodents are true hibernators during the cold winter months in Wisconsin. During this time, they can drop their body temperature down to 37 °F and lower their heart rate from 80 to 5 beats per minute. They typically emerge just in time to provide a spring weather forecast in early February. 😉

A huge thanks to Zooniverse participant @oregano for the #SuperSnap nomination!

Continue classifying photos on Zooniverse and hashtagging your favorites for a chance to be featured in the next #SuperSnap blog post. Check out all of the nominations by searching “#SuperSnap” on the Snapshot Wisconsin Talk boards.

New Team Member

Hi everyone! I’m Jessica Knackert, one of the newest additions to the Snapshot Wisconsin volunteer management team. Before coming to the DNR, I graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where I studied zoology, science communication, and environmental studies. I engaged in a lot of great opportunities to share science with the public during my undergraduate career. I wrote numerous articles on research related to climate change, urban canids, and biotechnology. I also provided hands-on demonstrations at community science events focused on culturing stem cells and caring for non-human primates.

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Outside of science outreach, I was a research assistant for the Carnivore Coexistence Lab at UW-Madison. I supported a graduate student examining the impact of an African lion reintroduction in Akagera National Park, Rwanda. This project fell in the same realm of wildlife research as Snapshot Wisconsin by using trail cameras to monitor animal populations and behavior. I also worked at the Milwaukee County Zoo. Being a part of the visitor services department gave me the chance to interact with thousands of guests from all over the nation each day. This role also allowed me to broaden the Zoo’s guided tour program by incorporating topics like conservation, wildlife research, and animal enrichment.

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Giraffe from Akagera National Park (https://www.africanparks.org/the-parks/akagera)

Working for a project like Snapshot Wisconsin provides the perfect opportunity to combine my experience in both the research and outreach sides of science. While I loved classifying photos of iconic African wildlife halfway across the world, I’m eager to refamiliarize myself with the diversity of species that live closer to home. I’m also excited to apply my training in science communication to expand upon and diversify educator outreach for the project. Snapshot Wisconsin is a great way for people of all ages to gain first-hand experience in learning the scientific process. Greater educator participation would allow students across the state to explore Wisconsin’s great outdoors while engaging with DNR professionals and other community members when inside the classroom.